ConsonantalAssimilation in Four Dialects of Jordanian Arabic

Wael Zuraiq, Maisoun Abu-Joudeh

Abstract


The current study investigates assimilation between consonants across a word boundary in four dialects of Jordanian Arabic. Sixteen native speakers of the 4 dialects provided the production part (four from each dialect). Another 16 trained listeners heard the phrases; and readings were transcribed. The paper reports a number of asymmetries along the dimensions of place, manner, voicing and directionality. These asymmetries are corresponding to earlier typological works in the literature (e.g. Mohanon, 1993; Jun, 1995) and a few which are not. The study presents rich linguistic data, contributing as the basis for a valuable cross-dialectal study of consonant assimilation in JA. Consonant assimilation in the four dialects provides excellent support for the results of some previous studies on assimilation in consonant clusters.

Keywords


Arabic dialects; Consonant assimilation; Place; Manner; Voicing

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968%2Fj.sll.1923156320130602.3506

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