“Who Am I”: Alice’s Quest for Knowledge and Identity in Wonderland

Aihong REN

Abstract


This paper aims to discuss Alice’s search for knowledge and identity in her dream adventures in Wonderland. In her dream journey in Wonderland, Alice undergoes emotional upheaval and physical transformations, encounters various creatures, and experiences a loss of and quest for identity, and finally gains self-confidence and returns back to the reality. Her journey can be said to be a quest for knowledge and identity, and also a process of maturity and growth. Alice grows more and more confident and autonomous, which is atypical of the Victorian ideal female.

Keywords


Alice; Quest; Identity; Autonomy

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/n

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