Web-Based Case Studies versus Text-Based Case Studies: A Comparative Study of Pre-service Teacher Engagement

Brianne Walsh Morettini, Kimberly Simpson Reddy

Abstract


The study compares how the format of a text-based case and a web-based case impact students’ engagement and learning; it represents an effort to document a comparative study of different formats of cases and their effectiveness in an undergraduate social studies methods teacher education course at UMCP. Participants are pre-service teachers enrolled in an undergraduate teacher education course. Each participant will experience both formats of a case over two course sessions so as to ensure instructional equity across groups. Overall, this study is an effort by the researchers to (a) document students’ learning and engagement with written cases and web-based cases and (b) to assess students’ own preferences for a case study format in an undergraduate teacher education course.


Keywords


Teacher Preparation; Educational case studies; Pre-service teacher engagement

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968%2F4929

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