An Analysis of Doctor-Patient Conflict Talks in Grey’s Anatomy

Wenting LIU

Abstract


Conflict talk is one of the research objects of discourse analysis. This paper takes Grey’s Anatomy as corpus sources, a TV series in ABC, selecting some fragments of discourse that have high frequency of appearance in the series, analyzes the conflict talk between doctors and patients from the perspective of pragmatics, gives a further explanation about conflict talk and its duality, aiming to survey the conflict talks from a unique way, affirming that it plays a positive role in interpersonal relationship.

Keywords


Conflict talk; Pragmatic analysis; Grey’s anatomy; Effects

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/8128

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