Human Endosymbiotic Archaea, Retroviral Resistance and Emerging Viral Pandemics: The Crossing of Species Barrier and New Viruses

Ravi Kumar Kurup, Parameswara Achutha Kurup

Abstract


Introduction: Studies from our laboratory have shown that global warming and the low level EMF pollution results in increased endosymbiotic archaeal growth. The archaea can produce methanogenesis from hydrogen and carbon dioxide as well as from acetate. The human body methanogenesis can result in more global warming. Global warming is initially triggered by carbon dioxide and EMF pollution produced by homo sapien industrialization. It is carried forward by human endosymbiotic archaeal overgrowth and methanogenesis. The archaea can induce stem cell conversion and neanderthalisation of the human species. The archaea catabolises cholesterol generating digoxin which can modulate RNA editing and magnesium deficiency resulting in reverse transcriptase inhibition. The archaeal cholesterol catabolism can deplete the membrane rafts of the CD4 cell of cholesterol impeding the entry of the retrovirus into the cell. The archaea can produce permanent immune activation producing resistance to viral and bacterial infection. The archaeal cholesterol catabolism depletes tissue cholesterol producing vitamin D deficiency and immune activation. Thus archaeal overgrowth results in retroviral resistance and generation of the Neanderthal phenotype. The endosymbiotic archaea can secrete virus like RNA and DNA particles. The endosymbiotic archaea can induce uncoupling proteins inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and generating ROS. The endosymbiotic archaeal magnetite can generate low level of EMF. The low level of EMF and ROS are genotoxic and produce breakages in hotspots of chromosome. It can also trigger rearrangements in hotspots of chromosome inhabited by retroviral and non-retroviral elements producing their expression. The archaeal secreted DNA and RNA viroids can recombine with the expressed retroviral, non-retroviral elements and other genomic segments of the human chromosome generating new RNA and DNA viruses. Thus the neanderthalised humans can serve as an origin for new RNA and DNA viruses as well as mutated retroviruses. The endosymbiotic archaea converts the Neanderthal cells to stem cells. The stem cells are resistant to immune attack. The stem cells can serve as a reservoir for this new RNA and DNA viruses. The stem cells and archaeal cells can also serve as a reservoir for viruses and bacteria belonging to other plants and animals. This helps to generate the species barrier jump in noted in recent emerging viral and bacterial infections. This paper studied the archaeal status in patients with recurrent viral infections and retroviral infections. The generation of RNA and DNA viroids from archaea was also studied.
Materials and Methods: Blood samples were drawn from normal population, Neanderthal phenotype, retroviral infection and recurrent viral infection. There were 10 patients in each group and each patient had an age and sex matched healthy control selected randomly from the general population. The blood samples were drawn in the fasting state before treatment was initiated. Plasma from fasting heparinised blood was used and the experimental protocol was as follows (I) Plasma+phosphate buffered saline, (II) same as I+cholesterol substrate, (III) same as II+cerium 0.1 mg/ml, (IV) same as II+ciprofloxacine and doxycycline each in a concentration of 1 mg/ml. Cholesterol substrate was prepared as described by Richmond. Aliquots were withdrawn at zero time immediately after mixing and after incubation at 37oC for 1 hour. The following estimations were carried out:- Cytochrome F420, free RNA and free DNA. Cytochrome 

F420 was estimated flourimetrically (excitation wavelength 420 nm and emission wavelength 520 nm).
Results: Plasma of Neanderthal phenotype showed increased levels of the above mentioned parameters with after incubation for 1 hour and addition of cholesterol substrate resulted in still further significant increase in these parameters. The plasma of retroviral patients and those with recurrent viral infections showed similar results but the extent of increase was insignificant. The addition of antibiotics to the control plasma caused a decrease in all the parameters while addition of cerium increased their levels. The addition of antibiotics to the patient’s plasma caused a decrease in all the parameters while addition of cerium increased their levels but the extent of change was more in Neanderthal phenotype sera as compared to patients with retroviral infection and recurrent viral infection. The results are expressed in tables 1-2 as percentage change in the parameters after 1 hour incubation as compared to the values at zero time.
Discussion: The homo neanderthalis has archaea as endosymbionts. The archaea behaves like stem cells and can induce conversion of somatic cells to stem cells. The stem cells and archaeal cells can serve as reservoirs of other species virus and bacteria like plant and animal viruses and bacteria. The plant and animal viruses and bacteria can thrive in the somatic stem cells and archaeal cells as they escape immune detection. The Neanderthals tissue system can be compared to an archaeal/stem cell colony or network which serves as a reservoir for other animal and plant species bacteria and viruses as well as a generating centre for new RNA and DNA viruses. The RNA and DNA viruses are created by recombination between expressed genetically rearranged bits of the human chromosome and virus like DNA and RNA particles secreted by the archaea. This paves way for the generation of unlimited number of new RNA and DNA viruses as well as produce conditions for viruses and bacteria to cross the species barrier. This is evidenced by the SARS virus, the nipah virus and hendra virus crossing species. The algal virus has been reported to infect human brains producing cognitive dysfunction. The generation of new RNA and DNA viruses and the creation of a stem cell/archaeal reservoir for other species bacteria and viruses, the Neanderthal resistance to infections by viruses and bacteria and the Neanderthals serving as a reservoir for infection results in widespread pandemic in the homo sapien population in Africa and their eventual wipeout.
Conclusion: Global warming depends on human endosymbiotic archaeal overgrowth and methanogenesis. The archaea can induce stem cell conversion, archaeal digoxin induced RNA editing, digoxin induced magnesium deficiency & reverse transcriptase inhibition and cholesterol catabolism induced CD4 receptor produces retroviral resistance. The archaeal secreted DNA and RNA viroids can recombine with the expressed retroviral, non-retroviral elements and other genomic segments of the human chromosome generating new RNA and DNA viruses. Thus the neanderthalised humans can serve as an origin for new RNA and DNA viruses as well as mutated retroviruses. The stem cells and archaeal cells can also serve as a reservoir for viruses and bacteria belonging to other plants and animals. This helps to generate the species barrier jump in noted in recent emerging viral and bacterial infections.


Keywords


Retroviral resistance; Genomic viral elements; Archaeal viroids; New virogenesis; Homo sapien extinction; New Neanderthal species

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/6031

DOI (PDF): http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/g6813

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