Special Topics: Extending Legal Protection to Social Robots

The special topic calls for papers on Extending Legal Protection to Social Robots and such papers will appear in Studies in Sociology of Science as a special column.

Affiliated research area: Morality, Human Intelligence, Equality, Human Rights, Social Principle

Description:

Most discussions of “robot rights” play out in a seemingly distant, science-fictional future. While skeptics roll their eyes, advocates argue that technology will advance to the point where robots deserve moral consideration because they are “just like us,” sometimes referencing the movie Blade Runner. Blade Runner depicts a world where androids have human-like emotions and develop human-like relationships to the point of being indistinguishable from people. But Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, the novel on which the film is based, contains a small, significant difference in storyline. In the book, the main character falls in love with an android that only pretends to requite his feelings. Even though he is fully aware of this fact, he maintains the one-directional emotional bond. The novel touches on a notably different, yet plausible, reality: humans’ moral consideration of robots may depend more on our own feelings than on any inherent qualities built into robots.

This distinction hints at an approach to robot rights that is not restricted to science fictional scenarios. Looking at state of the art technology, our robots are nowhere close to the intelligence and complexity of humans or animals, nor will they reach this stage in the near future. And yet, while it seems far-fetched for a robot’s legal status to differ from that of a toaster, there is already a notable difference in how we interact with certain types of robotic objects. While toasters are designed to make toast, social robots are designed to engage us socially. At some point, this difference may warrant an adjustment in legal treatment.

Requirements:

In addition to the Review and Original Articles by invited speakers, we are inviting you to submit a relevant research paper on Extending Legal Protection to Social Robots for consideration. Papers will be subject to normal peer review and must comply with the Guide for Authors.

To submit papers to the “Extending Legal Protection to Social Robots” Special Topic, please go to http://www.cscanada.net. With your submission, please state clearly to the editor that your manuscripts are submitted to the Special Topic Extending Legal Protection to Social Robots.

 

Related Journals (Special issue):

Studies in Sociology of Science, ISSN 1923-0176 [Print], ISSN 1923-0184 [Online]. http://cscanada.net/index.php/sss/index

Related Articles:

Kate Darling (2012, April). Extending legal rights to social robots.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)-MIT Media Laboratory, We Robot Conference, University of Miami. From http://robots.law.miami.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Darling_Extending-Legal-Rights-to-Social-Robots-v2.pdf



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