On the Establishment of a National Human Rights Institution in China

Ming NIU

Abstract


Contemporary human rights have universal values, and human rights issues are important factors in assessing the legitimacy of a government . The Paris Principles provide an international standard to establish a national human rights institution in each country. To comply with the development of international human right cause and overcome deficiency of decentralized domestic human rights institutions, it is necessary to establish a kind of national human rights institution which is in line with international standards as well as the situation of China. Based on a number of conditions that has been initially possessed for the establishment of a national human rights institution, China should make further preparations progressively for the institution’s establishment in order to implement the constitutional principles and fulfill its international obligations.


Keywords


The Paris principles; A national human rights institution; Human rights protection

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/11595

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